How a Dacility Manager Learns Which Expectations to Manage

As a facility manager, it is imperative to know what expectations you are expected to manage. You are in charge of spearheading the project and ensuring a satisfied finished outcome within time and budget constraints all while keeping the end user happy. Where does a facility manager begin to learn and understand which expectations to manage? Here are four ways to learn how to be the best facility manager possible through managing expectations:

1. Standardization: There are processes that have taken place prior to ensure that each benchmark is completed successfully. Learning the standardization of a facility management process, from design to planning to installation is a useful thing to understand when managing expectations. Familiarizing yourself with the skeleton of a normal workflow behind each project will help set a familiar precedent that will guarantee end user satisfaction because there will be a clear path to completion from the start. The end user will have defined expectations from the start.

2. Networking: A facility manager has to manage the expectations of a project, but of themselves as well. They are expected to have the tools ready and sharp to complete a successful project. Learning how to network will help expedite processes and help the overall project. A facility manager is responsible for procurement and knowing vendors. Networking is a way to building strong relationships and knowledge of competitors, prices, and working styles. This familiarity helps a facility manager understand what expectations need to be managed and how to do so by having the right connections ready for any project they may encounter.

3. Practice Sharing: Naturally, there will always be competition to be the best facility manager, but why not make friends in the process? A mentor, a friend, or simply other colleagues, will have tips and anecdotes from past projects. Learning and sharing is key to understanding what the best practices are for managing expectations. Knowing what went well, and even what might have gone wrong, adds to the knowledge of managing expectations and how a facility manager can better themselves for future opportunities.

4.  Feedback: Learning how to take feedback, both positive and negative, is a crucial learning step to managing expectations. Each end user will have their own reservations about a project, but as a facility manager it is crucial to know what went well and what did not. Learning and growing from past experiences will dictate which expectations need to be addressed from the start. Feedback can be included with networking and practice sharing, because it can include the feedback of all facility managers. This is a vital step to learning how to manage expectations.

Learning how to manage expectations as a facility manager can be difficult, but imperative to become successful. A facility manager gains their knowledge on how to manage expectations through experience, but also through the steps above! At HF Planners, we have experienced facility managers that are skilled in managing expectations. Call us today to ensure that your next project will be managed seamlessly from start to finish.

The Future of the Workplace Workspace

At some point in our adult life, we were expected to accept the 9-5 office position with a desk in front of a stationary computer. However, just months before this assumed transition, we were getting our school work done laying on a bed, papers sprawled about with music blasting in the background. Alternatively, we were in a library setting, often choosing which seat had the best lighting, or could fit as many friends as possible at one table, or had enough outlets to power all the devices that needed a charge. Whatever the situation, we had the freedom to work how and where we wanted, without conforming to the workplace expectation. What if the office finally caught on, and our employers listened to our past college selves, and let their employees choose their own work setting again?

This concept is called hoteling, hot desking, free address, or activity-based working. No assigned seats, no boring cubicles, but rather spaces where employees are actually comfortable, and the resources they need are readily available. It began with employees wanting more flexible hours. “Longer hours do not necessarily make workers more productive,” and then employers realized that productivity stemmed from employees feeling comfortable in their locations. That’s when designers started helping companies to begin “….revamping its notion of the workplace” (Market Watch The new office floorplans: flexible or demoralizing?” 2019).

 Hoteling is a practice in workspaces that allows for employees to reserve a space and resources they need in the office on a non-permanent basis. Hot desking is where employees are able to come and go freely, with no assigned space. Co-workers can reclaim their old habits and work how they feel accustomed to, and how they used to get their best work done. Activity-based working is an office space that has a variety of settings, from couches, to desks, to formal conference rooms, back to comfy chairs and hammock swings. These methods have been proven to save the office real estate finances and save money on resources because less space and materials are needed when the employees are only using the space and things they need, not what they are assigned. As an added bonus, less space and resources call for more environmentally greener workplaces as well.

 With this new wave of non-conforming work environments, productivity and employee satisfaction has peeked. Who would have thought your college self had it right this entire time?

Want to learn more about the future of workplace office workspace, and to take your company to the next level? Contact us today!

Benefits of Plants in the Office

With the ever-changing laws on Paid Sick Leave – it is important for Building Owners and Facilities Managers to take preventative action against any threat inducing any form of illness. Extensive research from Wageningen University and scientific company Fytagoras showed that people who work in an office that has plants, call in sick 20 percent less often than people working in rooms with no plants.

For more information on the benefits of incorporating plants in your office, call us today!

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Incorporating Biophilic Design in Your Office can Increase Productivity

According to research carried out by Harvard Business Review, 47% of employees feel very tired due to the absence of natural light and lack of biophilia in their office environment. While similarly – other studies have shown that potted plants can reduce and lower levels of blood pressure and anxiety.

“The use of sunlight, natural materials, and green elements will not only improve an office’s appearance; it may result in more creative, productive and happier members of staff. When businesses are considering how to redesign their premises, perhaps they should consider letting the outside in.”

Call HF Planners, LLC today for a free consultation!

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How Adding Natural Elements To Your Office or Business Can Benefit Your Health

The addition of plants to the workplace has emotional and physical benefits that combine with improved concentration and focus.

“A 2-year study conducted across 51 offices revealed that plants in the workplace reduced fatigue by 20%, headaches by 30%, coughs by 40%, sore throats by 30% and dry skin by 25%.”